See Spot Run, and next ………? See Spot Bite

Spot is looking good and moving right along, congratulations are in order, and yet the designers of this doggy robot aren’t concerned about this robot’s ability to outcompete other robots so that it can survive and reproduce, those are problems #100,001 and #100,002 in the evolution of a doggy robot. They are concerned solely with its capacity to project force into its surroundings and to absorb and resist the forces that are projected onto it. These are problems #1 and #2 in the evolution of a doggy robot. Could it be any different in the evolution of living animals?
The Constructal Law teaches us that there is only one kind of evolution, an optimizing of the capacity to move mass and energy farther and faster, an amplification of the capacity to project and to absorb force. This is also what my reading of animal behavior through an immediate-moment manner of analysis indicates as well. Furthermore, the epicenter of this doggy robot’s mind is resolutely fixated on its center of gravity. That is how it is perceiving and interpreting the nature of what is happening to it.
Interestingly, if in Spot’s wiring a return to equilibrium were coupled to its balance circuitry by way of an oral urge, i.e. “grounding;” then we’d observe a very complex auto-tuning social impulse spontaneously emerging in Spot’s behavior because its capacity to project and absorb force by coupling with others would be infinitely expanded, and, I don’t know about you, but for all us doggy robot lovers out there, there’d be a whole lot less doggy robot kicking going on.

Published March 7, 2015 by Kevin Behan
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Books about Natural Dog Training by Kevin Behan

In Your Dog Is Your Mirror, dog trainer Kevin Behan proposes a radical new model for understanding canine behavior: a dog’s behavior and emotion, indeed its very cognition, are driven by our emotion. The dog doesn’t respond to what the owner thinks, says, or does; it responds to what the owner feels. And in this way, dogs can actually put people back in touch with their own emotions. Behan demonstrates that dogs and humans are connected more profoundly than has ever been imagined — by heart — and that this approach to dog cognition can help us understand many of dogs’ most inscrutable behaviors. This groundbreaking, provocative book opens the door to a whole new understanding between species, and perhaps a whole new understanding of ourselves.
  Natural Dog Training is about how dogs see the world and what this means in regards to training. The first part of this book presents a new theory for the social behavior of canines, featuring the drive to hunt, not the pack instincts, as seminal to canine behavior. The second part reinterprets how dogs actually learn. The third section presents exercises and handling techniques to put this theory into practice with a puppy. The final section sets forth a training program with a special emphasis on coming when called.
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