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The Body Does More Than Carry The Head Around

Most treatments of behavior, as far as I know, treat the brain as the seat of the mind and the sole computer of behavior. In my reading of canine behavior however I've learned that anatomy is more important in how the mind composes its view of reality than cognitive processes. An organism learns about the world by moving through it and absorbing and transmitting forces. The impacts of these exchanges determine its view of the world and these transfers are a function of the capacities and strictures of its anatomy. (Anatomy is so important because this accords a systems logic to behavior that immutably leads to social structure, the basis of evolution. Whereas an individuated logic with instincts thrown in cannot account for social behavior.) The article below shows how gears (never before known to exist in biological adaptations) are integrated into the legs of an insect so that its leaps are synchronized to a degree impossible by a nervous system which wouldn't be able to process such data fast enough. This capacity to propel itself to this degree of effectiveness would determine how such an organism composes a view of reality, such as it may be. My argument is that this is true of higher animals as well. The body does more than carry the head around. It engages in transfers of force as it moves, these transfers are a function of its anatomy and are the fundamental factor shaping how its mind, and therefore its impressions of the world, evolve.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130912143627.htm?fb_action_ids=592174017496128&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_ref=.UjXVUwlJJ4c.like
Published February 22, 2015 by Kevin Behan
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Books about Natural Dog Training by Kevin Behan

In Your Dog Is Your Mirror, dog trainer Kevin Behan proposes a radical new model for understanding canine behavior: a dog’s behavior and emotion, indeed its very cognition, are driven by our emotion. The dog doesn’t respond to what the owner thinks, says, or does; it responds to what the owner feels. And in this way, dogs can actually put people back in touch with their own emotions. Behan demonstrates that dogs and humans are connected more profoundly than has ever been imagined — by heart — and that this approach to dog cognition can help us understand many of dogs’ most inscrutable behaviors. This groundbreaking, provocative book opens the door to a whole new understanding between species, and perhaps a whole new understanding of ourselves.
  Natural Dog Training is about how dogs see the world and what this means in regards to training. The first part of this book presents a new theory for the social behavior of canines, featuring the drive to hunt, not the pack instincts, as seminal to canine behavior. The second part reinterprets how dogs actually learn. The third section presents exercises and handling techniques to put this theory into practice with a puppy. The final section sets forth a training program with a special emphasis on coming when called.