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A Snark Is An Explosive Yawn Jul 02, 2012

Calming signals or emotion as a group mind? Calming?      Yes Signal?         No The most significant thing in this video is that the brown dog at all times acts as a mirror, as the equal and opposite to the Malamute and, it also has a drive to approach the Malamute, […]

What’s the Difference Between NDT and Lure/Reward Training? Jun 27, 2012

Cliff (of Lenny fame) and Eric Brad has an interesting exchange on Eric’s site, linked below, and this gives me the opportunity to emphasize again the fundamental distinctions between NDT and Learning Theory. And even though I’ve probably said these things many times on this site before, perhaps in this interweaving of a number of […]

Design In Nature -8- Mar 16, 2012

“Design In Nature” Zane, J. Peder; Bejan, Adrian (2012-01-24). Design in Nature: How the Constructal Law Governs Evolution in Biology, Physics, Technology, and Social Organization (Kindle Locations 1560-1564). Random House, Inc.. DIN: “One of the most powerful insights born from the constructal law is that social systems are natural designs that emerge and evolve to […]

The Body Plugs The Brain Into The Mind Dec 15, 2010

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/out-of-our-brains/ The story linked above and the comments that follow is another indication that science will ultimately abandon the brain as synonymous with the mind, and thoughts as the central core of consciousness. However, the problem that continues to plague the way science approaches the problem is that they are entertaining the mind as a […]

Moose and Wolf Dec 06, 2010

Angelique sent me the link below. It’s a great example of the attraction that the wolf feels for its “prey” and how once again, the prey-controls-the-predator. Now if I were one to put thoughts in a wolf’s head, the thoughts that would come to mind would be, “Is that you mommy?”

Indy and Milo Recreate the Past Oct 11, 2009

“Hey Kevin, my name is Ben Grubbs and I’ve been (trying) to practice NDT ever since I discovered it, and I’m a frequent poster on your blog– I was hoping you had a moment to take a look at a video I shot this morning. I am dogsitting a friend’s dog named Milo who is […]

Why do dogs bark at strangers? Aug 14, 2009

Because it’s their owner acting strange. There are three things I need to explain in regards to this phenomenon. First, in the animal mind, the form-of-a-thing, such as a human, cat, deer, etc, or sometimes even a log, is the confluence of two energies, predatory and prey. The ratio of these two energies compose a […]

Why Do Dogs Zoom-zoom-zoom Around the House? Jun 01, 2009

Behaviorists call the syndrome of a dog running helter-skelter around the yard, or zooming from room to room in the house “frequent, random activity periods (FRAPS). However this is a profound misnomer because there’s nothing random about this activity. When a dog goes zoom-zoom-zoom it is actually fear coming to the surface so that it […]

Books about Natural Dog Training by Kevin Behan

In Your Dog Is Your Mirror, dog trainer Kevin Behan proposes a radical new model for understanding canine behavior: a dog’s behavior and emotion, indeed its very cognition, are driven by our emotion. The dog doesn’t respond to what the owner thinks, says, or does; it responds to what the owner feels. And in this way, dogs can actually put people back in touch with their own emotions. Behan demonstrates that dogs and humans are connected more profoundly than has ever been imagined — by heart — and that this approach to dog cognition can help us understand many of dogs’ most inscrutable behaviors. This groundbreaking, provocative book opens the door to a whole new understanding between species, and perhaps a whole new understanding of ourselves.
  Natural Dog Training is about how dogs see the world and what this means in regards to training. The first part of this book presents a new theory for the social behavior of canines, featuring the drive to hunt, not the pack instincts, as seminal to canine behavior. The second part reinterprets how dogs actually learn. The third section presents exercises and handling techniques to put this theory into practice with a puppy. The final section sets forth a training program with a special emphasis on coming when called.